Microsoft Mouse 3600 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

I like this Microsoft “Mobile Mouse” 3600. It connects to my laptop via bluetooth so there’s no need to add a dongle.

It works with Linux but it’s a bit finicky. In this post I’m addressing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. This might seem like moot point because 18.04 LTS is literally right around the corner. However, there a chance it’s meticulous connection procedure will still need to be followed. So here’s how to consistently get it to connect to your computer.

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Flysky iA6 RX ā€“ telemetry and failsafe with OpenTX

I ordered an iA6 receiver for a flying wing I picked up at the local R/C swap meet. It took 30 days to get here from China. 😒 How have I not learned not to order stuff during the Chinese New Year? Once I got it, there were a few tricks and troubles I went […]

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I ordered an iA6 receiver for a flying wing I picked up at the local R/C swap meet. It took 30 days to get here from China. šŸ˜’ How have I not learned not to order stuff during the Chinese New Year? Once I got it, there were a few tricks and troubles I went through, so here’s the rundown.

I specifically purchased the Turnigy iA6 (same as FS-iA6) instead of the iA6BĀ for a few reasons. It has leads coming off of the top instead of the end, so it’s effectively shorter when servo connectors a plugged in. Perfect for the Techone Mini-Popwing which has a small receiver cut-out. It also has a rudimentary telemetry system built in, and the first version (non-B) can be hacked very easily to provide battery voltage telemetryĀ to the transmitter.

The telemetry hack is well covered in the RCGroups link above, so I won’t go into it, but will outline a couple other issues I encountered.

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200mm TC6

I did this mod to my TC6.1 because it’s a dedicated VTA racer. To be honest, 99% of the people out there racing VTA are using 190mm touring car chassis’. However they’re all also running 200mm bodies on them, which can sometimes look a little weird with the wheels tucked way up underneath. Many of […]

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I did this mod to my TC6.1 because it’s a dedicated VTA racer. To be honest, 99% of the people out there racing VTA are using 190mm touring car chassis’. However they’re all also running 200mm bodies on them, which can sometimes look a little weird with the wheels tucked way up underneath.

Many of the 200mm VTA bodies that we use today were created by HPI in the early 2000s before the USVTA series existed. They were originally intended to be used with their RS4 chassis which included settings for both 190mm touring car bodies (The chassisĀ actually measured 180mm), and 200mm for their wider bodies. The rear vintage wheels and tires have an offset so the 200mm bodies don’t look too bad on a 190mm chassis. But a select few bodies like the ’70 Charger and ’68 Camaro have an extra-wide 210mm rear. This is when the wheels tucked under look a little silly. Let’s fix that…

Parts

On the TC6.1 there’s 3 places where the width can be adjusted:

  1. At the bulkhead using spacer washers
  2. At the hinge using the offset style for an extra millimeter
  3. At the hub using wheel spacers

Arm Spacing

I started by spacing out the arm mounts 2mm from the bulkheads using the AE Bulkhead Washers, and by switching to the offset arm mounts AE 31361Ā – which I believe will also work on a TC5 (you can see how I widened my TC5 as well). The offset arms give an extra 1mm of spacing.

Now’s when we’ll replace the stock 14mm button head hex screws with longer 18mm ones to accommodate the extra width.

Axle Spacing

I verified that the Tamiya axles were a drop-in replacement fit on the TC6 wheel hubs. Now it was just a matter of getting the right dog-bone length.Ā The length listing on the swing shafts are always from the pin-to-pin on the dog-bone. The stock TC6.1 CVA bones are 45mm. The AE bones have a slightly smaller ball (and cross pin) where it meets the axle – so you can’t just mate the AE bone to the Tamiya axle. Best to switch the whole swing shaft assembly to Tamiya.

I started my axle fitment research with the TamiyaĀ 53847 46mm assembly (not included in the list above). Here’s what it looks like side-by-side with the TC6.1 and Tamiya swing shafts with the pins lined up.

At this point you might be asking: why the heck would I want to switch from AE to Tamiya axle assemblies? Why not just add wider wheel adapters to the AE axles? Doing that is not easy. If you look at the difference between the AE and Tamiya axles, you might notice that the AE axle is 4mm, then it steps up to 5mmĀ afterĀ the wheel adapter pin hole. The Tamiya one uses the otherwise universal 1/10 scale standard of being 4mm, then stepping up to 5mm before the wheel adapter pin hole. By switching to a Tamiya axle, you can run virtually any wheel hex out there… Except of course, Associated Engineering šŸ™‚

Note: the assembly pictured above & below uses a different part number for the axles (TamiyaĀ 9804380) which haveĀ slightly longer cups than the more widely available TamiyaĀ 54076:

This alternative may be useful for mixing and matching the axles and dog bones for slightly different lengths, especially if you need to simulate an odd-sized (43mm, 45mm, 47mm, 49mm) shaft length (the stock TC6.1 swing shafts are 45mm center to center).

Ultimately theĀ TamiyaĀ 54076Ā axles andĀ TamiyaĀ 51092Ā 46mm swing shafts were the best fit at all 4 corners for this particular setup. If you’re not spacing out the arms, but want to be able to switch out the wheel hexes to standards, use the Tamiya 54078 44mm swing shafts instead.

Axle Fit

The Associated CVA bone blades fit a little tight on the Tamiya pins. For the right fit, carefully drill out the holes using a #46 size bit (just over 2mm). A 3/32″ bit would likely work in a pinch but will have a little extra clearance.

Tamiya makes the dog bones for sizes 42mm, 44mm, 46mm, and 48mm so you should be able to find the right size to get things perfect.

Final Spacing

Once the axles are installed, you might have to adjust some things to accommodate the wider setup:

  • Suspension arm mount location
  • Shock tower mount location
  • Camber link location

Of course once fully done you’ll want to re-adjust your droop, ride height and camberĀ šŸ˜Ž

With the suspension arms buttoned up, insert the standard size wheel adapter pin. You won’t be able to add the M4 washer that normally goes between the wheel pin and the bearing, but that’s OK.

Let’s take a look at all the adjustments we made:

This nets +6mm on each side, +12mm in total. It’s a little overkill (202mm) – but the setup is now ready for quick and easy adjustment just with the wheel adapters. Sizes are readily available for 4mm-7mm.Ā Other cool things you could potentially do with this setup is turn a TC6 into a rally car. With the extra wide bulkhead spacing you could really let the arms droop and add longer shocks. Don’t be afraid to get creative!

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R/C and VRC transmitter speed with VRC USB Giveaway!

After having some troubles playing VRC, I started to look at my hardware to see if there was some gains to be had there because while I’m not a great racer in real life, I’m also not terrible 😎 I wound up doing a lot of research regarding the relative speed and latency of various tx/rx […]

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After having some troubles playing VRC, I started to look at my hardware to see if there was some gains to be had there because while I’m not a great racer in real life, I’m also not terribleĀ šŸ˜Ž I wound up doing a lot of research regarding the relative speed and latency of various tx/rx brands and models. The most concrete measurement I could come up with is theĀ PWM frequency sent from the receiver to the ESC & servo(s). PWM signals are often must faster than PPM signals that are used by buddy-box or direct servo control systems. This is important in regards to playing VRC.

I gathered results measured by myself and others using the SkyRC Program Box. It is not a foolproof measurement of end-to-end latency – the delay from when you give a controller input and the ESC reacts to it. But it’s a clear metric, and part of the overall latency we can measure easily.

Much of this may not even matter to you. The average human reaction time is on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. For transmitter latency we’re talking about tens of milliseconds or less. Also, the transit time even the fastest servos are around 50 milliseconds, so that is another part of the equation that is difficult to reduce. But just because the measured latency is less than what we as humans can react to, it doesn’t mean these delays can’t be perceived, even if it’s just in the way something feels.

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Beginnerā€™s Guide to VRC PRO

I can’t always get to the track to actually race, so the next best thing is playing Virtual RC Pro. I can practice or race at anytime, no matter what my family’s schedule is or what the weather is like. I initially had some trouble playing VRC, so I put this together to document how […]

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I can’t always get to the track to actually race, so the next best thing is playing Virtual RC Pro. I can practice or race at anytime, no matter what my family’s schedule is or what the weather is like. I initially had some trouble playing VRC, so I put this together to document how I was able to improve gameplay, and my driving. The first part of this is about getting VRC set up and working well. The second part is about racing electric on-road cars in VRC (that’s what I drive at our local tracks). But there may be a buggy in my future so subscribe to get those updates as well!

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Team Associated TC6/VCS3 Yokomo Spring Upgrade

What’s the point of switching to bigger bore springs on a standard bore shock? Some say the wider springs provide a different feel, but mostly I did it to be able to run a spring rate softer than the softest Team Associated Green (12lb./in.) springs. Softer springs are especially helpful for tight (read: small) high-traction […]

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What’s the point of switching to bigger bore springs on a standard bore shock? Some say the wider springs provide a different feel, but mostly I did it to be able to run a spring rate softer than the softest Team Associated Green (12lb./in.) springs. Softer springs are especially helpful for tight (read: small) high-traction indoor carpet track racing like we have here in Minnesota. Most of the guys that do this mod switch to Yokomo springs, so that’s what we’ll cover.

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Simultaneous website testing before a hosting switch

So you’re getting ready to move your website. You’ve got the new hosting plan purchased, and you’ve got the files and data copied over. You set up your hosts file to point to the new host, but something doesn’t look quite right šŸ˜•

You could keep editing your hosts file and refreshing your browser to try to figure out what is different… Or you could take 5 minutes to set up a socks proxy so you can view both the new and old site in two different browsers at the same time! Here’s how to do it:
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Power Supplies

This little power supply from Ready Made RC is a tremendous bargain. The specs are fantastic on paper – but it doesn’t pack quite as much punch as advertised. I have two large capacity (5200mAh) 6S batteries that I use to power my electric lawn mower. This power supply buckled after just 2.5 charges 😞 Here’s […]

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This little power supply from Ready Made RC is a tremendous bargain. The specs are fantastic on paper – but it doesn’t pack quite as much punch as advertised. I have two large capacity (5200mAh) 6S batteries that I use to power my electric lawn mower. This power supply buckled after just 2.5 chargesĀ šŸ˜ž Here’s how it went…
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